Water Heaters

After heating and cooling, water heating is typically the largest energy user in the home because it is necessary for so many domestic activities. The capacity of a water heater is an important consideration. The water heater should provide enough hot water at the busiest time of the day. We offer a wide variety of electric, gas and tankless water heaters.

Tank Water Heaters

Bradford White Water Heaters Bradford White Logo

Pros:

  • Proven technology that home owners know and trust. The straightforward system has been around for years and works well.
  • Lower product cost and low installation cost. Installation is fairly simple.
  • Energy Star tanks are now available. As of this year, the Energy Star program certifies conventional high-efficiency gas water heaters, so it’s possible to save energy and money. Units must have an energy factor of .62.

Cons:

  • Conventional tanks are always on. No matter how energy efficient it is, a storage tank cycles on a regular basis to heat and reheat water at a preset temperature, using energy to heat the water whether a homeowner needs it or not.
  • Big and bulky. Most storage tanks take up precious real estate in a mechanical or laundry room, especially in smaller homes such as apartments, condos, or townhouses.
  • May be inadequate. Depending on the capacity and household hot water needs, a conventional storage tank may not be able to meet demand. If not sized correctly for peak demand, tank water heaters will run out of hot water.
  • Less versatile installation. The unit needs a fairly large space for installation and cannot be located outside the home.
  • Less durable. The life expectancy of a conventional hot water tank is about 12 to 15 years.

Tankless Water Heaters

Rinnai Water Heater
Rinnai Water Heater

Pros:

  • Saves energy. The unit only operates when there is a demand for hot water, which can reduce its energy cost by about 25% annually.
  • Highly efficient. The most efficient storage tank has an energy factor of about .67, but, according to Energy Star, some tankless units have energy factors as high as .95.
  • Reliable. If a unit is sized properly, a gas tankless heater can deliver a continuous supply of water at a preset temperature (plus or minus one degree) at a rate of typically 2 gallons to 5 gallons per minute. The units never run out of hot water, though the flow rate may be inadequate during times of peak demand.
  • Compact size. The typical tankless heater is about the size of a small suitcase, which takes up significantly less space than a conventional tank.
  • Durable. It has a life expectancy of 20 years or more.
  • Versatile. The unit is easy to zone and it can go almost anywhere in the house. It also can be installed outside on a wall.

Cons:

  • Tankless units cost about twice as much as traditional storage tanks.
  • Installation is expensive. In addition to the high product cost, installation for the unit and the necessary piping can be pricey. They also need very good venting, which is also expensive.
  • Retrofit can be pricey and complicated. Unlike a traditional tank, retrofitting a home with a tankless unit can require different venting and gas piping.
  • Best performance comes from gas units. Though gas-fired tankless units are great performers for whole-house use, electric units are woefully inadequate. Electric units are not Energy Star-rated.

Features

Energy Saver Direct Vent Energy Saver High Efficiency Electric Everhot Tankless
Type Gas Gas Electric Gas
Energy Efficiency High efficiency Standard Efficiency High Efficiency Ultra High Efficiency
Tank Capacity 40-50 gal. 30-100 gal. 40-80- gal. 2.5 gal. per minute
Vent - Type Direct Vent Standard Vent None Direct Vent
Factory Warranty
Tank
6 or 10 years 6 or 10 years 6 or 10 years 10 year on heat exchanger
Factory Warranty
Parts
6 years 6 years 6 years 5 years

Let the experts at Doylestown Air help explain all the details and customize a solution that's right for you.

Frequently Asked Questions

What does the Energy Factor (EF) on my water heater mean?

Where is the "anode rod" and what does it do?

Why doesn't my old water heater make as much hot water as it used to?

If my water heater was in a flood, do I need to replace it?

Can I use my water heater with a solar heating system?

Is a drain pan necessary?

What type of maintenance should I do on my water heater?